Choosing Colours: These 6 Tertiary colours are made by

Choosing The Right Colour
for Your Website Design

 

Why Colour is Important:

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

 

This colour
selection tutorial is geared towards new web designers.  The use of appealing colour combinations on a
website can drastically enhance your site and achieve the desired emotional
response from the viewer. This can significantly increase the number of users
who continue browsing your website rather than losing interest and moving on to
other sites.  It can also increase the
desired effect that you are aiming to achieve from your site, also known as web
conversions.  This could be in the form
of sales, email subscriptions, subscribers and many more.  This is achieved by using visually
appealing/effective calls-to-action buttons, such as “Add to Cart”, “Sign up
Now”, etc. 

 

The Colour
Wheel:

 

Let’s start
with the basics of the colour wheel.

 

Primary
Colours:

The 3
Primary Colours are Yellow, Red and Blue. 
These are colours that cannot be created by mixing any other
colours.  Instead these are the base
colours that are used to create all other colours on the colour wheel.  All colours have shades and tints.  The pure colour, which is shown on the color
wheel is called the ‘hue’.  A shade is
when you add a percentage of black to the pure colour.  A tint is the result of adding some white to
the hue.

 

 

 

Secondary
Colours:

Secondary
colours are Purple, Green and Orange. 
These are created by mixing equal amounts of adjacent primary colours.

 

1.    
Purple:  made by mixing Red and Blue.

2.    
Green:  made by mixing Blue and Yellow.

3.    
Orange:  made by mixing Red and Yellow.

 

 

 

Tertiary
Colours:

These 6
Tertiary colours are made by mixing equal parts of neighbouring Primary and
Secondary colours on the colour wheel.

 

 

Traditional
Colour Schemes:

These
colour combinations are tried and tested combinations that are typically
visually appealing to the eyes.

 

1.    
Monochromatic
colour scheme

2.    
Analogous
colour scheme

3.    
Complementary
colour scheme

4.    
Split
Complementary colour scheme

5.    
Triadic
colour scheme

 

 

Monochromatic
colour scheme:

This is
achieved by selecting one hue and using any of the tints and shades of that
colour.  This style of design is very
calm but you must carefully choose varying degrees of shades and tints in order
to see a definitive contrast between the colours.

 

 

Analogous
colour scheme:

This is
achieved by selecting 3 colours that are next to each other on the colour
wheel.  This style of design is very
soothing to the eyes and lends well for a relaxed calm site.

 

 

Complementary
colour scheme:

This is
achieved by selecting 2 opposing colours on the colour wheel.  This style of design is great for colour
contrast but can be a bit hard on the eyes. 
You must be careful when using this colour scheme.  It can be very busy if you choose the actual
hues.  Shades and/or tints can make this
colour scheme more pleasing to the viewer.

 

 

Split
Complementary colour scheme:

This selection
of 3 colours requires that you first choose one colour from the colour wheel
and its direct opposite.  Then omit this
second colour and instead replace it with the 2 adjacent colours.  The original colour and these 2 adjacent
colours combined make up the split complementary colour scheme.  This style of design is similar to the
complementary scheme, in that it offers good contrast.  Choosing this scheme is safer than the
complimentary as it not as harsh on the eyes.

 

 

Triadic
colour scheme:

This is
achieved by selecting 3 colours that have an equal distance from one another on
the colour wheel.  This colour scheme can
be very tricky and is best used once you have lots of design experience.  You can easily have an overtly bright webpage
that is too shocking to the eyes with simply too much variances in colour on
the page.

 

 

HOW COLOURS
AFFECT OUR MOOD

 

Colour
Silently Affects our Mood and Interpretation of the Website Before Even Reading
the Content:

 

 

 

Different
colours spark different feelings and moods within the reader.  Here are some general descriptions of
feelings associated with different colours:

 

BLUE: 

–      
Often
interpreted as a colour of trust, competence and masculine.

–      
Commonly
seen in large corporations and/or IT professions.

–      
Creates
a calm and relaxed feel. Can be very peaceful.

 

 

PURPLE:

–      
Colour
of royalty and often associated with wealth.

–      
Feels
feminine and romantic.

 

RED:

–      
Energetic,
passionate, dangerous, and often seen as too vibrant/loud.

–      
Great
for call-to-action buttons as it is attention grabbing.

–      
Can
be perceived as angry. May also represent blood.

 

GREEN:

–      
Signifies
nature.  Very calming and a sign of
renewal/regeneration – liveliness.

–      
Often
used in the environmental industry.

–      
Symbolizes
wealth and a positive flow of money.

–      
May
also be perceived as sign of jealousy.

 

YELLOW:

–      
Simply
put – Yellow is a Happy colour.

–      
Used
for children’s websites.  Largely used as
a call-to-action button as it is attention grabbing.

–      
Symbolizes
caution.

 

 

ORANGE:

–      
Enthusiastic
and considered a colour that stimulates action.

–      
Largely
used as an accent colour that accompanies popular blue very well.

–      
Gives
a warm and cozy feeling.

 

 

PINK:

–      
Symbol
of femininity.

–      
Romance,
love, softness.

–      
Largely
used in feminine web spaces and children’s sites.

 

 

WHITE:

–      
Pure
and clean.

–      
Great
for contrast.

–      
Symbolizes
grief in some cultures.

 

GRAY:

–      
Neutral
and calm.

 

 

BLACK:

–      
Represents
power, intelligence and sophistication.

–      
Great
for contrast and creating a luxurious feel.

–      
Symbolizes
grief in some cultures.